6 step process for improving attendance

Attendance is unarguably a persistent area for improvement across all Key To Apprenticeships (K2A) delivery but there are pockets of best practice that we can learn from. K2A provider, Young Person’s Opportunities Project (YPOP) has very good rates of attendance. Anastasia Johnson, director at YPOP shares the 6 features of their no-nonsense approach to tackling absence and punctuality:

 

  1. Three members of staff share responsibility for addressing morning attendance: the office manager, the pastoral care manager, and an administrative assistant.
  2. The administrative assistance visits every class at the centre by 9.15am each day to see which students are missing
  3. The office manager phones the off-site training centres to check if any students haven’t arrived by 9.15am
  4. The parents or carers of students who have not arrived are informed by phone
  5. If there is no response from the parent/carer, the pastoral care manager carries out a home visit
  6. Students who are absent without just good reason are sent a letter which informs them that they will lose their place if they do not improve. This letter is sent to their home address which gets the parents/carers on side.

These methods mimic procedures at school and may seem regimented but they produce the desired results for YPOP.

What works for you? If you’ve got tips for tackling absence, or want to share your thoughts on what works and what doesn’t, please comment below.

GMLPF launch region’s first provider Sports Forum

GMLPF launch region’s first sports provider forum in response to calls for a coordinated approach to training in the sports sector

Developing a Blueprint

The inaugural GMLPF Sports Forum meeting took place last month at Tranmere Rovers’ newly refurbished grounds.

Membership Development Manager at GMLPF, Jo Rymer said:

“The GMLPF Sports Forum has been established to share best practice and to give a collective voice to members regarding the future of training for the fitness and leisure industry in the region.”

Representatives from various training organisations including football academies gathered to begin developing a blueprint for how the forum can operate.

Trailblazers

There are several types of end user that the providers want to create a dialogue with. They include potential professional sports people, young people in the NEET group, and anybody who wants to access post-16 education in the sports and leisure industry.

The forming of the group is not just good news for the industry but also anybody looking to take a related qualification, as well as employers wishing to recruit young people in the industry.  Hot topics that came up included how courses could be accredited with UCAS points and the Trailblazer Apprenticeship programme. The member organisations of the Sports Forum also expect that they will be able to refer applicants to each other as appropriate.

Watch This Space

One of the things that the sports providers are particularly passionate about is the wider impact they may be able to have on issues such as obesity and mental health amongst young people  So watch this space for further discussion around these topics.

Further meetings will take place on a quarterly basis.  Progress Sports, Tranmere Rovers academy, Fit UK, JM Education, TVC Wirral & Liverpool, SALT/LFC Academy and the Jamie Carragher Academy all attended the first meeting.

Updates and news on social media will carry the hashtag #GMLPFsports

For further information please contact [email protected]

 

Apprenticeship helps launch a promising sports coaching career for Adam

Adam Edwards recently completed 2 years’ training with GMLPF member, Progress Sports, and now has a promising career in sports coaching ahead of him. He combines working as PE teacher in a school with a job at Inspired Sports, passing on his knowledge and experience to pupils in a variety of schools.

Potential

Adam started training with Progress Sports in June 2013 on a 12-week pre-apprenticeship programme. Right away, Adam demonstrated the potential to be an excellent sports coach, also attending a weekly soccer school to develop his skills further.

After his pre-apprenticeship, Progress Sports arranged a trial period for Adam in Streatham School, Crosby. He impressed everyone so much with his professionalism and coaching ability that he was offered an Apprenticeship in Sports Coaching by the school. Employed by the school, he began working towards his level 2 qualification with training and support from Progress Sports. He achieved the qualification and completed his Apprenticeship within one year.

Adam then progressed onto an Advanced Apprenticeship in Sports Coaching and this summer he completed his level 3 qualification. Streatham School then offered him a job as a PE teacher at the school.

 

Alder Hey trainees

GMLPF funds pioneering project to help younger people work in the NHS

Merseyside teenagers will be the first to obtain a new certificate in healthcare, qualifying them to work in a paediatric setting

Pioneering course set to attract young people into nursing, helping balance the ageing workforce of the NHS

A dozen unemployed young people have completed a four week work placement at Alder Hey Hospital in Liverpool as part of a longer training Key to Apprenticeships programme funded by Greater Merseyside Learning Providers Federation (GMLPF). When they graduate, the teenagers, all aged 16-18, will be the very first in the UK to hold a new qualification for providing health care support to children. There has been an unprecedented demand for future places on the course from young people, many of whom are recent school leavers.

Easing burden

The initiative was the brainchild of Gill Mason, principal of GMLPF member, Alt Valley Community Trust, which runs a ‘Communiversity’ in the Croxteth area of Liverpool. It was conceived as a way to encourage young people to work in the NHS. Almost a third of workers in the NHS are aged 50 plus and the average age of an NHS health worker is set to rise to 47 by 2031. The crisis is spurred on by the pressure of the working environment forcing many into early retirement. Getting younger people into careers in the NHS has been identified as a way to ease the burden.

Three times as many young people applied for the course than the number of places available. The successful applicants have been training for six months in total, including the work placement at Alder Hey. Successful completion means the teenagers will be the first in the UK to be awarded a certificate in Health Care Support in the Paediatric Setting from CACHE (Council for Awards in Care, Health and Education).

Targeting unemployed young people

The funding to complete the training was targeted to those in the NEET category (Not in Employment, Education or Training). Elliot Quine (pictured), from Croxteth, was the youngest person on the course at just 16 years of age; he was joined by other teenagers from across Merseyside.

When the teenagers graduate it is expected that they will go on to either full Apprenticeships at the hospital, further training such as nursing or another job within the NHS. Their progress will be monitored to assess the longer term impact and to inform plans to roll out an expansion across the UK.

Alt Valley Community Trust has joined forces with Alder Hey Children’s hospital in Liverpool to deliver the practical elements of the course; whilst in the classroom recruits have been skilled up in everything from English and Maths to personal confidence.

Unlocking potential

Gill Mason says: “We are using vocational education and training to unlock potential and give young people a valuable role in society. There are more than 300,000 support staff in the UK, assisting doctors, nurses and other health professionals in caring for the sick and injured. Until now there has been no specific training for those doing such a job with children”.

Unique standards

There are 24 children’s hospitals across the UK that could benefit directly from the qualification. Paula Davies, Learning and Professional Development Manager at Alder Hey says: ‘Alder Hey prides itself in the delivery of learning initiatives which support excellent care for our children, their families and carers. We developed this qualification at the trust because we know that care of children and young people in whatever setting they are in should be underpinned by unique performance standards. These unique standards have never existed until now. It is great to see that by widening participation for learners from Alt Valley within our work-based learning environments and through implementation of the new standards we have all made a significant impact on both their future aspirations and career choices.’

Oversubscribed

Each week Alt Valley is receiving dozens of enquiries from schools and students who want to know more and the next course is already over-subscribed. Mason adds: “The interest in this course means that we have seen an unprecedented number of enquiries. Potential future students – especially those who don’t want to stay on in full time education – see the qualification as an alternative to college or sixth form”.

James Glendenning, CEO of GMLPF that funded the initiative, says: “Overwhelmed hospitals have seen staffing requirements increase and budgets fall. Whilst many solutions are mooted, few see the light of day. This grass roots initiative is designed to give young people, who would otherwise have been unemployed, a taste of working in the NHS and a massive boost to their career prospects.”

Julie Hyde, Executive Director at CACHE added: “CACHE developed this qualification in partnership with Alder Hey specifically to prepare learners with the knowledge, understanding and skills to cover a broad spectrum of care responsibilities in a paediatric setting. It’s fantastic to see that Alt Valley Community Trust is receiving so much interest from young people aspiring to gain the CACHE Level 3 Award, Certificate and Diploma in Healthcare Support in the Paediatric Setting.”

How Joe faced the challenges of autism

Joe Garcia’s eyes light up when he talks about his football club Liverpool and the young children he is helping navigate often troubled waters.

This incredible young man is working as a teaching assistant, which once would have seemed an impossibility. But – on a daily basis – he is helping diagnose primary school children as having the same challenges he faced himself during his early school years.

Overcoming Hurdles

After starting school in mainstream education near to his Walton home, something wasn’t right for Joe.

Eventually he spent a number of weeks in an assessment centre where his autism was diagnosed.  He was then accepted as a pupil by Abbots Lea school in South Liverpool. They understood him better and had an appreciation of the daily hurdles he experienced – dealing with crowds and noise were among them.

When he first started at senior school, even taking the bus was a challenge.  But a few years on Joe has spread his wings way beyond his once compact comfort zone.  Not only does he make his own way to work on a daily basis, he even enjoys being part of the crowd supporting Liverpool at Anfield.

Getting It Right

Joe is a great example of how when schools, training providers and the family work together there can be a happy ending.  Key2Apprenticeships provider and GMLPF member, Riverside LEC were instrumental in getting Joe’s career off to a flying start – they encouraged some work based experience towards the end of his school years. This and the enrichment he gained through his Duke of Edinburgh awards helped Joe build the confidence to step onto a K2A course.

Through delivering the training Joe actually needed and the real-world work experience, his confidence grew. Now aged 18, he’s on a full time apprenticeship at a primary school that has made a significant contribution to developing his potential. Alongside his colleagues at Matthew Arnold, Joe staffs the unit that helps stream young kids into the right education for them.

Full Time Employment

Entirely unassuming, it’s easy to see why Joe’s demeanour is perfect for this job. He says:  ‘It can be challenging but the kids are fantastic.  When they are struggling, I can relate to it and help calm them down or give them encouragement where it’s needed’.  However, nobody is going to pull the wool over this savvy young man’s eyes. Joe adds: ‘We still have to keep an eye on them as they can be strong willed too!  That doesn’t stop it being a dream come true to be working as a teaching assistant’.

Paul Feaver who heads up Riverside LEC speaks highly of Joe: ‘We’d like to see more students like Joe who, despite adversity, have got on the career ladder.  The Key2Apprenticeships programme can be styled around the needs of the individual student, no matter what their experience of school.  Joe really is a shining light to any young person who thinks that their individuality is a barrier to having a career.’

 

University a hit for music students

You might find it hard to imagine a group of young people, left disillusioned by school, suddenly deciding that they want to go on to higher education.  That’s exactly what happened with a group of young Key2Apprenticeship (K2A)students from GMLPF member Mode Training when they visited Staffordshire University. One of Mode’s popular K2A courses is Music Technology – students get a taste of what life would be like producing music, DJ’ing or being part of a band – even if they didn’t get any qualifications at school.  The course is designed to help young people gain the skills they need to start a career in the music industry

Pathway to university

During their time at Mode, students can achieve an NVQ Level 2 in Music Technology, but that’s not quite enough to get them onto a university course, and many don’t see higher education as something suited to them anyway. The team at Mode are setting about changing that view and the training centre, based on Sefton Street in Liverpool, is developing a pathway to university. Students who complete their level 2 Music Technology will be able to progress onto the Level 3. This qualification will provide an entry route to a degree in Music Technology, as an alternative to the traditional A-level route All that may sound like a bit of an uphill struggle for students who weren’t over enamoured by their school years, so when Mode were invited to visit Staffs Uni they took 15 K2A students along.

Solid career path

Lee Garry, a former K2A student who now works as an assessor with Mode explains: ‘The degree focuses on practical skills and the students we took to the university realised the facilities and the teaching were fantastic.’ Whilst the students were visiting they got to produce a music track so that it was release-ready. Lee adds: ‘The atmosphere at the uni was very different to school and our students were excited about the studios being available round-the-clock.  They came back even more focused and feeling that a degree and a solid career path was something within their reach’.

Track record

Wesley Tagoe at Mode added: ‘The music production course at Mode has a track record of success with many former students going on to become self employed in the music industry; and soon we hope to see some progressing to university.  The earlier young people come to us for help, the more effective we can be in securing their future’.

Mode Training is just one of many places young people can access training, support and qualifications.  Nobody should be put off getting in touch even if they didnt succeed at school or get any qualifications.

The Key2Apprenticeships programme is for 16-18 year olds. Anybody who wants to discuss their future is urged to get in touch on 0151 707 8775  to find out what courses are available.  Whilst on a K2A course, benefits arent affected, lunch is provided and some providers will also meet travel costs.

The Key2Apprenticeships programme is funded by Greater Merseyside Learning Providers Federation [GMLPF].

Helping Merseyside’s young people prepare for apprenticeships

GMLPF are encouraging young people aged 16 to 18 whose aim is to get an apprenticeship to consider enrolling on a Key to Apprenticeship (K2A) programme. GMLPF’s Key To Apprenticeship training programme is a vocational course that helps young people develop the skills, qualifications and experience employers are looking for when interviewing for apprenticeship positions.

Skills employers look for

Many young people who want an apprenticeship don’t have the minimum skills and qualifications that employers look for when they recruit apprentices. They may need to boost their Maths or English skills, or develop confidence and presentation skills, or gain some meaningful work experience. Key To Apprenticeships give young people a chance to develop the qualities they need, qualities that will improve their CV, and help them succeed at interview.

Marketing campaign

GMLPF have launched a 3 month K2A marketing campaign targeting 16 to 18 year olds who are currently not in any form of training, education or employment. The campaign includes:
• Bus panel advertising
• Press advertising
• Facebook competition; twitter
• SMS campaign
• Website re-launch
• Print

The aim of Key to Apprenticeships is to help young people access full Apprenticeships, enter employment or continue in further education.

Visit Key To Apprenticeships or email [email protected]

K2A students help set new Guinness World Record

Key2Apprenticeships students training with GMLPF member Progress Sports were part of the team helping a Widnes rugby club into the history books last week.

Widnes Vikings

The sports students, and their tutor Carl Fairhurst, joined Widnes Vikings to set a new Guinness World Record when they joined locals to form the world’s biggest group to do a fitness DVD – a total of 3,400 people took part. The previous record of 2,900 people was set in China.

Record-breaking work out

The record-breaking work out took place at the Widnes Vikings’ home ground prior to their opening Super League game. Fans that took part enjoyed free tickets to the game which ended in a spectacular 22-22 final score.

Progress Sports student Jordan Byrnes said: ‘It was a really good event and enjoyable day. It was also my first rugby league game and it was amazing’.

Key2Apprenticeships is a GMLPF funded training programme for 16 to 18 year olds. It provides the skills that boost their chances of getting an apprenticeship. Progress Sports are one of 12 GMLPF members who offer Key2Apprenticeships programmes. They specialise in courses leading to careers in sports and fitness instruction.

Prioritising student health & wellbeing

Students taking part in Key to Apprenticeship programmes run by GMLPF member, Mode are benefitting from new wellbeing aspects that have been added to their training courses.

Mode is piloting the initiative with students on both its Key to Apprenticeships programmes: Music and Hairdressing. The two-phase approach to improving students’ self-awareness includes firstly helping them to gain a better understanding of their own health and wellbeing, and then to help them develop increased mindfulness – a meditation technique that is increasingly popular and has shown to help young people manage stress.

Positive impact on achieving goals

Mode have always recognized the importance of promoting healthy lifestyle choices to young people. This project is laying the foundations that good physical and psychological wellbeing has a positive impact on achieving goals and ensuring success. At the end of the six-week programme, students progress to weekly mediation sessions to continue their wellbeing development.

Positive change in attitude

Debbie Tagoe, director at Mode, said: “It’s clear to me that the extra support we’re providing to our students by including these wellbeing modules is really worthwhile. When you look at statistics like Childline’s recent figures showing that they had 34,000 consultations with suicidal children last year, it’s obvious that any measures that we can take as training providers to maximise our students’ wellbeing can only be a good thing. Since the start of our pilot we have seen a positive change in attitude from our students – they are a lot more relaxed and want to participate in group activities more.”

Calmer

Speaking about the pilot, student Tia Johnson, said: “The sessions with Saeed are awesome – I loved the mediation part the best, it made me feel much calmer and also think about how I can improve my wellbeing.”

Positive message

Creator of the programme, Saeed Olayiwola from SO Health, concludes: “Training providers have a captive young audience and this programme presents an ideal opportunity for them to support young people to lead a healthy lifestyle physically and psychologically. By being the first training provider to embrace this programme, Mode has sent a positive message to their young people that they are committed to their overall health and wellbeing and are making them feel more valued, as well as helping to support the national Government vision for a healthier nation.”

Entrepreneurial students at Mode bring iconic female DJ to Liverpool

Mode music technology students Vinny Speare, Levy Hinds and Kieran Clarke have used their entrepreneurial skills to bring iconic female DJ Juicy M to Liverpool. The event has been organised in conjunction with club promoter Mick Ellis and will take place at Aura on Friday 2nd May to a capacity crowd.

Juicy M has become an internet phenomenon with in excess of 4 million people watching her Juicy M 4 decks clip on you tube. Since 2006 she has performed in more than 200 venues in more than 50 countries all over the world and has been described by DJ Storm as one of the most successful female DJs in the world.

Mode Music students: finger on pulse of current music scene

This is not the first time the students who are studying music technology at Mode have organised successful events in the city. They were the brains behind the Hypnosis under 18 events which packed both O2 academy and The Elevator during 2013.

DJ Les Calvert music technology tutor at Mode said

“The students from Mode Music are set to follow in the footsteps of many successful club promoters from Liverpool. They have their finger on the pulse with the current music of today knowing their audience. It’s refreshing to see something different happening in our city organised by young people who are passionate about music and not just into it for the money.”

Not only will Vinny, Levy and Kieran be promoting the event, they have also given the opportunity to fellow music technology students to perform a set at the event. Francis Mulrooney, Billy McGlashan, Glynn Williams and Duane Makin will all be DJing at the event.

Music industry qualifications

Vinny, Levy and Kieran gained their skills on Mode’s Key to Apprenticeships course in music production Students on this programme build real experience working in the music industry in order to achieve level 1 and 2 certificates in music technology, as well as supplementary qualifications in Maths,English and preparing for employment. The course is ideal for those who wish to start a career in music production. Students who complete the course can progress into freelance careers or onto full Apprenticeship programmes.

For more information on the music technology courses available at Mode contact their recruitment team a call on 0151 709 4640.