6 step process for improving attendance

Attendance is unarguably a persistent area for improvement across all Key To Apprenticeships (K2A) delivery but there are pockets of best practice that we can learn from. K2A provider, Young Person’s Opportunities Project (YPOP) has very good rates of attendance. Anastasia Johnson, director at YPOP shares the 6 features of their no-nonsense approach to tackling absence and punctuality:

 

  1. Three members of staff share responsibility for addressing morning attendance: the office manager, the pastoral care manager, and an administrative assistant.
  2. The administrative assistance visits every class at the centre by 9.15am each day to see which students are missing
  3. The office manager phones the off-site training centres to check if any students haven’t arrived by 9.15am
  4. The parents or carers of students who have not arrived are informed by phone
  5. If there is no response from the parent/carer, the pastoral care manager carries out a home visit
  6. Students who are absent without just good reason are sent a letter which informs them that they will lose their place if they do not improve. This letter is sent to their home address which gets the parents/carers on side.

These methods mimic procedures at school and may seem regimented but they produce the desired results for YPOP.

What works for you? If you’ve got tips for tackling absence, or want to share your thoughts on what works and what doesn’t, please comment below.

More People Mapping Out Careers with GMLPF

GMLPF’s online training directory Mapped Out, designed to help teenagers find out what training opportunities are available to them when leaving school, has notched up over 4000 searches over the past 3 months.

Visits to the GMLPF site are reaching 5000 per month with a third of them landing directly on the Mapped Out search page for information on the training options available to them . Membership Development Manager Joanne Rymer explains:

‘In recent months we’ve seen thousands of people visit us at www.gmlpf.net/mappedout for the first time.  The resource is the only one of its kind in the UK that brings together training opportunities for the region across different sectors and levels of qualification.  It’s a particularly useful tool for providers to engage with the difficult to reach audience of 16 to 18 year olds.’

On the portal teenagers can search for training ranging from Study Programmes to Higher Apprenticeships.

Visitors to the site choose which area of Merseyside they want search results for and can even drill down into the type of job they would like to do. Results are shown on a map alongside handy information such as which bus routes reach provider training centres.  Teenagers can submit an email enquiry via Mapped Out or use the provider contact details to telephone.

Dental nurse qualifications, hairdressing and sports-related training are among the most popular career opportunities that young people want more information on.

Any training organisations wishing to become a GMLPF member and list their courses on Mapped Out can email joanne@gmlpf.net for more details.

Alder Hey trainees

GMLPF funds pioneering project to help younger people work in the NHS

Merseyside teenagers will be the first to obtain a new certificate in healthcare, qualifying them to work in a paediatric setting

Pioneering course set to attract young people into nursing, helping balance the ageing workforce of the NHS

A dozen unemployed young people have completed a four week work placement at Alder Hey Hospital in Liverpool as part of a longer training Key to Apprenticeships programme funded by Greater Merseyside Learning Providers Federation (GMLPF). When they graduate, the teenagers, all aged 16-18, will be the very first in the UK to hold a new qualification for providing health care support to children. There has been an unprecedented demand for future places on the course from young people, many of whom are recent school leavers.

Easing burden

The initiative was the brainchild of Gill Mason, principal of GMLPF member, Alt Valley Community Trust, which runs a ‘Communiversity’ in the Croxteth area of Liverpool. It was conceived as a way to encourage young people to work in the NHS. Almost a third of workers in the NHS are aged 50 plus and the average age of an NHS health worker is set to rise to 47 by 2031. The crisis is spurred on by the pressure of the working environment forcing many into early retirement. Getting younger people into careers in the NHS has been identified as a way to ease the burden.

Three times as many young people applied for the course than the number of places available. The successful applicants have been training for six months in total, including the work placement at Alder Hey. Successful completion means the teenagers will be the first in the UK to be awarded a certificate in Health Care Support in the Paediatric Setting from CACHE (Council for Awards in Care, Health and Education).

Targeting unemployed young people

The funding to complete the training was targeted to those in the NEET category (Not in Employment, Education or Training). Elliot Quine (pictured), from Croxteth, was the youngest person on the course at just 16 years of age; he was joined by other teenagers from across Merseyside.

When the teenagers graduate it is expected that they will go on to either full Apprenticeships at the hospital, further training such as nursing or another job within the NHS. Their progress will be monitored to assess the longer term impact and to inform plans to roll out an expansion across the UK.

Alt Valley Community Trust has joined forces with Alder Hey Children’s hospital in Liverpool to deliver the practical elements of the course; whilst in the classroom recruits have been skilled up in everything from English and Maths to personal confidence.

Unlocking potential

Gill Mason says: “We are using vocational education and training to unlock potential and give young people a valuable role in society. There are more than 300,000 support staff in the UK, assisting doctors, nurses and other health professionals in caring for the sick and injured. Until now there has been no specific training for those doing such a job with children”.

Unique standards

There are 24 children’s hospitals across the UK that could benefit directly from the qualification. Paula Davies, Learning and Professional Development Manager at Alder Hey says: ‘Alder Hey prides itself in the delivery of learning initiatives which support excellent care for our children, their families and carers. We developed this qualification at the trust because we know that care of children and young people in whatever setting they are in should be underpinned by unique performance standards. These unique standards have never existed until now. It is great to see that by widening participation for learners from Alt Valley within our work-based learning environments and through implementation of the new standards we have all made a significant impact on both their future aspirations and career choices.’

Oversubscribed

Each week Alt Valley is receiving dozens of enquiries from schools and students who want to know more and the next course is already over-subscribed. Mason adds: “The interest in this course means that we have seen an unprecedented number of enquiries. Potential future students – especially those who don’t want to stay on in full time education – see the qualification as an alternative to college or sixth form”.

James Glendenning, CEO of GMLPF that funded the initiative, says: “Overwhelmed hospitals have seen staffing requirements increase and budgets fall. Whilst many solutions are mooted, few see the light of day. This grass roots initiative is designed to give young people, who would otherwise have been unemployed, a taste of working in the NHS and a massive boost to their career prospects.”

Julie Hyde, Executive Director at CACHE added: “CACHE developed this qualification in partnership with Alder Hey specifically to prepare learners with the knowledge, understanding and skills to cover a broad spectrum of care responsibilities in a paediatric setting. It’s fantastic to see that Alt Valley Community Trust is receiving so much interest from young people aspiring to gain the CACHE Level 3 Award, Certificate and Diploma in Healthcare Support in the Paediatric Setting.”

GMLPF members feature in Wirral schools mag

GMLPF sponsors a regular section in Good2Go, an education, careers and training magazine that is distributed to young people through schools across the Wirral. The GMLPF-sponsored section focusses on vocational options at 16 including Apprenticeships and Traineeships.

Platform for GMLPF members

This sponsorship not only raises the profile of alternative options to staying on at school 6th form, it also provides a platform for exposure of GMLPF members’ courses amongst its primary target market – school leavers. GMLPF has been running this sponsorship for 2 years, with many members having been featured in the magazine in features and magazines. Members report that the sponsorship has resulted in more awareness of their courses, and has generated good leads for them.

Members featured

Good2Go is printed and distributed to schools three times a year. The most recent edition has just been printed and the GMLPF section features articles on members Mode, Riverside Learning and Education Centre, tpm and The Vocational College, as well as an interview with GMLPF CEO, James Glendenning.

This is just one of the activities GMLPF runs to support its members by raising the profile of their provision and services. Any GMLPF member who would like to be featured in the next edition of the magazine should contact pavlina@gmlpf.net

GMLPF sponsored section in Good2Go June 2015

GMLPF commissions summer radio campaign to support members

As part of its ongoing programme of support for its members, GMLPF have commissioned a summer advertising radio campaign on Juice FM. The campaign, which runs from the end of June, targets school leavers and other young people, encouraging them to make use of GMLPF’s online training directory, Mapped Out.

Training options

Mapped Out lists all GMLPF’s members, providing a live, searchable database of the training courses they offer. It is designed to help young people explore the training options available to them when they leave school, or if they drop out of college. These include Apprenticeships, Traineeships, Study Programmes and NVQs, searchable by industry sector. The directory provides useful information such as the location of training providers and colleges who provide the courses, transport routes, and details of additional support available including financial support.

Raising awareness of GMLPF members

The aim of the radio campaign is to raise awareness of the full range of options available to young people aged 16 to 18. In addition, the campaign supports GMLPF members by generating interest in their courses.

The radio campaign begins in the last week of June and runs until September with 3 adverts featuring Jon Briggs, the voice of iphone’s Siri. GMLPF members are encouraged to ensure that the information they have uploaded to the GMLPF Mapped Out directory is current in time for the start of the campaign at the end of June.

Exclusive member benefit

Inclusion in the Mapped Out online directory of training for 16 to 18 year olds is exclusively for GMLPF members, one of the numerous benefits of membership. To find out more about becoming a member please contact Jo Rymer, Membership Manager on 0151 707 8775 or email joanne@gmlpf.net

For more information on the Mapped Out directory or the Juice FM radio campaign contact pavlina@gmlpf.net